Gov. Walker expected to make decision on Kenosha casino in 25 days

Posted on: 6:15 pm, September 29, 2013, by , updated on: 10:19pm, September 29, 2013

KENOSHA (WITI) – The proposed Kenosha casino has groups spending millions in advertising, and has politicians handing out endorsements. It isn’t a political race, but both sides are spending money like it is. However, in the end, the voters won’t have a say — just Gov. Scott Walker — and he has 25 days to make his decision.

Gov. Walker has a self-imposed 25 days to decide whether an off-reservation casino will be built in Kenosha.

Meanwhile, those for and against the Menominee Tribe’s proposed casino say it all comes down to jobs.

Those for the casino say the Kenosha casino will create jobs.

“This project would create more than 5,000 direct and indirect jobs,” Evan Zeppos said.

Those who oppose the casino say it actually risks jobs by over-saturating the gaming market — something that will hurt Milwaukee’s Potawatomi Bingo Casino in particular.

“We believe that gaming has hit its capacity in the state. We’ll spend whatever we can raise.  We’re in an ongoing effort to try and get our message out there,” Brian Nemoir said.

“We’re on a shoe-string budget.  Probably less than a quarter million dollars.  Been on the air for about 3.5 weeks and they’ve spent millions in the last month attacking this project,” Zeppos said.

A new study from the Menominee Nation says 62% of voters in southeastern Wisconsin with an opinion on the casino favor Gov. Walker approving it.

“The biggest supporter for this project in our poll was Walker Republicans,” Zeppos said.

“There’s a thousand ways you can write questions and tweak results to get the response you want,” Nemoir said.

Wisconsin has 11 tribes and 24 casinos.

The Menominee Nation says they are the poorest tribe in the state, and the Potawatomi is one of the richest.

Gov. Walker has said there are three things he will consider when making his decision: no new net gaming, community support and tribal approval.

Both Potawatomi and Ho-Chunk tribes have expressed opposition.

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