Flash flood watch issued for Kenosha, Walworth counties through Friday morning
2018 FIFA World Cup Fan Guide ⚽
Where to watch FOX6 News, Real Milwaukee during World Cup Soccer ⚽

The government won’t let couple name their baby what they want

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.

Brentwood, TN (WSMV) — A Brentwood couple is suing the state of Tennessee for the right to choose the surname for their newborn son.

Kim Sarubbi and her husband Carl Abramson named their child Camden Sabr. The last name Sabr is shared by their two older children and is a combination of letters from both of the parents’ last names.

“We had a lot of fun creating the name,” Sarubbi said.

The two older children were born in other states where there was no objection to the newly created surname.

But the state of Tennessee won’t allow the name Sabr on the baby’s birth certificate.

Sarubbi said the day after their son was born, she got a call from Tennessee’s Vital Records office. They told her they couldn’t use the name Sabr, because Tennessee law mandates that a baby’s last name has to be either the father’s last name or a combination of both parent’s last names.

The family is suing the state, with help from the ACLU.

“It’s about changing the law. It’s an outdated law,” Sarubbi said.

“It’s a parental right to name your child whatever you want. It has no bearing on the state whatsoever,” Abramson said.

The couple has two other children, Alex and Maya. They were born in other states, where the combined surname was never an issue.

“Our first two children have Sabr. So to have two kids with one name, but we can’t name the other one Sabr. It’s just bizarre,” Abramson said.

State officials declined to comment, citing the pending lawsuit.

15 comments

  • Lyn

    Sounds like these parents have lived in the magical land of Sabr for to long! Most parents want their children to have their last name not some made up combo. Guess times are truly changing. Just my opinion

  • Chris Sobush (@csobush)

    At first I thought this was a bit ridiculous, but if you think back to the early days of immigration – how many of us have “shortened” or “americanized” surnames? How is this any different? I don’t see a problem with it, or how it’s any of anybody’s business – especially the government’s.

  • Laura

    It used to be a person’s last name was an honest able thing, carried on from generation to generation. The reason men always like to have sons, to carry on their family name. I just don’t get this at all.

  • Nellie Musignac

    1- “The last name Sabr is shared by their two older children and *is a combination of letters from both of the parents’ last names*.”
    2- “They told her they couldn’t use the name Sabr, because Tennessee law mandates that a baby’s last name has to be either the father’s last name *or a combination of both parent’s last names*.”

    What? I do not see a problem, by this article’s wording…

  • wmckenzie99

    So why a lawsuit? Easier – and cheaper – to just go back to court and file for a name change to what you want, same as anyone who wants to legally change their name.

  • workin mama

    So, by the law, the baby also couldn’t have just the mother’s last name… so if the mother and father aren’t married, and the father is not involved, the baby still can’t have the mother’s name?? I can’t believe it took until now for this to be challenged.

  • PATTI GREEN

    THEY LEGALLY HAVE TO NAME THERE FIRST CHILDS AFTER THEMSELVES SO THEY ARE JUNIORS LIKE RICHARD PETTY AND TOM PETTY. WHEN THEY NAME THERE KIDS SOMETHING ELSE THE SCHOOLS DONT KNOW WHO THERE PARENTS ARE.

    • K

      Except for the fact that schools have emergency contacts listed for every child and what their relationship is to said child. They don’t HAVE to do anything of the sort, my source for this is first hand experience.

Comments are closed.