“We bought a meth house:” Couple worries after learning meth was cooked, smoked in their new home

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.

MICHIGAN (WITI) -- A Grand Rapids, Michigan couple recently purchased a home, and they've learned that home was used to make methamphetamine. Heather and Brian Vanorder tell FOX6's sister station FOX17 in Michigan they believe they were lied to about renovations done to their home. They say the renovations were done to cover up checmicals left behind from the meth that was cooked up and smoked in their home -- something they say is threatening their physical and financial well being.

Heather Vanorder tells FOX17 she has a history of Multiple Sclerosis and Rheumatoid Arthritis -- and she's fearful the chemicals in her home will hurt her family in the future.

The Vanorders moved into their home in December 2014. They say shortly after they bought the home, a man who used to live in the upstairs unit of their duplex told them something that surprised them.

“He was 100% sure they cooked meth in there -- and that he helped the seller cover it up,” Heather Vanorder told FOX17.

The conversation was recorded.

In it, the former upstairs tenant says he helped the home's former owner renovate the kitchen and bedroom to cover up the drug activity. The Vanorders have had two tests run in the kitchen and bedroom, and those tests have revealed levels of methamphetamine much higher than what the EPA allows, according to FOX17.

"You see it in the movies. You watch 'Breaking Bad.' But you get a house with it? It's like, what do I do?" Brian Vanorder said.

Heather and Brian Vanorder say they're living out of moving boxes, afraid of contaminating anything that would come into contact with the home.

"We bought a meth house. I don't even have words anymore," Heather Vanorder said.

FOX17 reports there is no law requiring a seller to disclose former drug activity or other crimes. A short paragraph in the seller’s disclosure agreement asks for information on any “environmental contamination,” to the home. It’s a rule easily sidestepped, as the Vanorders’ believe was the case here.

Heather and Brian Vanorder tell FOX17 they're focusing on making their home a safe place to live. The estimated cost to do so is $20,000 -- and they've reached out to the public for help, setting up a GoFundMe.com account.

CLICK HERE for more on this story via FOX17.

5 comments

  • jamie

    I see this as the people seeking money. You should properly investigate and get all the facts before purchasing a home

  • Reasonless

    Wow…. a fundraiser to help someone with a bad investment.
    Does this actually work?
    Whenever I made a bad investment and realized it, I called myself a dumb a*s*s and moved forward learning from my mistake.
    I find this whole thing rather overwhelming in many different ways.

  • One voice

    I DON’T believe you walked in, looked at a house & just bought it. That kind of action is a time consuming DECISION that takes numerous appointments. Plenty of time to ask all the questions that are important, considering Heather’s health. At least, that would be at the top of MY LIST. Along with the fact that, you had to have looked at a MINIMUM of 3 homes, before making your grand decision.
    2) Having a tenant ALREADY LIVING in the unit, should have prompted an immediate boat load of questions that should have been ASKED. Ever heard of ccap? Google? Address news search? THE INTERNET?
    3) Everyone generally knows what it takes to purchase a home. Usually 10% down, some type of credit & a good JOB to afford the payment. You however, have a bonus income since you have a unit that you rent out.
    It looks to me like you know EXACTLY what you’re doing. Greed be the word. How about FLIPPING the house & moving on. Oooh wait…. you made a spectacle & drew a lot of ATTENTION to your chemical filled home. GOOD LUCK

Comments are closed.