‘Mockingbird’ author Harper Lee buried in Alabama hometown

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Harper Lee, whose debut novel, "To Kill a Mockingbird," immortalized her name with its story of justice and race in a small Southern town and became a classic of American literature, has died. She was 89.

MONROEVILLE, Ala. — The author of the America classic “To Kill a Mockingbird” was laid to rest Saturday, in a private ceremony attended by only the closest of friends and family, a reflection of how she had lived.

Harper Lee, who died Friday at age 89, was eulogized at a church in the small Alabama town of Monroeville, which the author used as a model for the imaginary town of Maycomb, the setting of Lee’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel.

A few dozen people were at the ceremony at First United Methodist Church where Lee’s longtime friend, history professor Wayne Flynt, eulogized her.

Afterward, her casket was taken by silver hearse to an adjacent cemetery where her parents, A.C. Lee and Frances Finch Lee, and sister, Alice Lee, are buried.