Protesters to rally across US to back Apple in battle with FBI, including in Glendale

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SAN FRANCISCO  — Protesters are preparing to assemble in more than 30 cities to lash out at the FBI for obtaining a court order that requires Apple to make it easier to unlock an encrypted iPhone used by a gunman in December’s mass murders in California.

The protests organized by the Internet rights group Fight for the Future are scheduled to occur Tuesday. February 23rd outside Apple stores in more than 20 states.

A rally is planned outside the Apple store at the Bayshore Town Center in Glendale at 5:30 p.m.

The gatherings will come a week after the FBI went to court to force Apple to weaken the security built into most iPhones to help a terrorism investigation in San Bernardino, California.

Apple is fighting the court order issued in the case, arguing that the special software sought by the FBI could be used to break into millions of other iPhones.

7 comments

  • Thinblue

    That’s ok let innocent people continue to die. Let pedophiles lure your children. I’m sickened by Apple and all of it’s supported fans. Boycott Apple!!!!!

  • Libtards are Satan's disciples

    Considering it was another Muslim involved terrorist act,Apple shouldn’t have a choice to not let the Muslim terrorist’s phone records be turned over. Typical PRO-Thug LIbtards

    • numquam interum numquam ante

      Listen, The FBI is using this “opportunity” to “learn” how to hack into EVERYONE’S iphone. not just innocent Sammy’s. That’s why Apple said no. Open your minds.

  • warthog

    Throughout the FBI’s history, informant numbers have been closely guarded secrets. Periodically, however, the bureau has released those figures. A Senate oversight committee in 1975 found the FBI had 1,500 informant [15]s [15]. In 1980, officials disclosed there were 2,800 [16]. Six years later, following the FBI’s push into drugs and organized crime, the number of bureau informants ballooned to 6,000, the Los Angeles Times reported [16] in 1986. And according to the FBI, the number grew significantly after 9/11. In its fiscal year 2008 budget authorization request [17], the FBI disclosed that it had been working under a November 2004 presidential directive demanding an increase [18] in “human source development and management,” and that it needed $12.7 million [19] for a program to keep tabs on its spy network and create software to track and manage informants.
    University of California-Berkeley’s Investigative Reporting Program [98], headed by Lowell Bergman, where Trevor Aaronson [1] was an investigative fellow. The Fund for Investigative Journalism [99] also provided support for Aaronson’s reporting. Lauren Ellis [100] and Hamed Aleaziz [101] contributed additional research.

  • molon labe

    No, The FBI Does Not ‘Need’ The Info On Farook’s iPhone; This Is Entirely About The Precedent

    Over and over again as people keep talking about the Apple / FBI encryption stuff, I keep seeing the same line pop up. It’s something along the lines of “but the FBI needs to know what’s on that phone, so if Apple can help, why shouldn’t it.” Let’s debunk that myth. The FBI absolutely does not need to know what’s on that phone. It might not even care very much about what’s on that phone. As the Grugq ably explained last week, there’s almost certainly nothing of interest on the phone. As he notes, Farook destroyed his and his wife’s personal phones, indicating that if there were anything truly important, he would have destroyed the last phone too.

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