“I watch the news and cry:” Mother, sister of homicide victim speak out after 24 murders in August

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MILWAUKEE -- August in Milwaukee made the history books. The city had 24 homicides in August -- the highest total since July of 1991. There are faces behind the numbers -- and families left devastated.

25-year-old Bennie Bennett was killed in a double homicide on August 9th. His family says they feel pain not only for his death, but for all of the other families experiencing what they are.Bennett homicide

"It's very devastating because never would I have thought it would be my child," said Dinese Bennett, victim's mother.

Bennie Bennett

Bennie Bennett

For nearly one month, Dinese Bennett and her family have been suffering.

"It really hits home when it happens to you," said Dinese Bennett.

Her 25-year-old son, Bennie Bennett, was killed in a double homicide in early August. It happened in a home at 36th and Congress.

"I'm hurting so bad inside. I don't rest. I don't sleep," said Dinese.

Bennett was one of 24 people killed in Milwaukee during the month of August -- the highest monthly total since July of 1991.

"I watch the news and I cry," said Ashley Ross-Bennett, victim's sister.

The family shares the pain of others who are grieving. They are asking those in the city to look for solutions.homicides

"It feels like Milwaukee is going through a crisis," said Ross-Bennett.

"The violence is... it's outrageous," said Dinese Bennett.

Dinese Bennett

Dinese Bennett

This mother and daughter wear charms on their necks filled with Bennett's ashes.

"It makes me feel secure, but a lot of sadness also," said Dinese Bennett. "I just want justice for Bennie. That's all."

Bennett's ashes

Bennett's ashes

Justice many families are hoping to see in a city that is grieving together.

"I'm praying that Milwaukee will get better," said Dinese Bennett.

5 comments

  • imcrazy

    Milwaukee will get better when the DA and judges start protecting the honest people instead of babying the criminals.
    Honest Peoples Lives Matter

  • JaneDoeSpeaks

    As a white women and sister of a gun shot victim raised in Sherman Park I know the whole spiel of send them to prison doesn’t work. I was one of the very lucky ones that stayed off welfare, finished high school and went to college. That stigma of being from the park was always there, always used against me.

    The greatest problem in Sherman Park is its about the cash. Prosecutors and corrections have put bread on the table harping the idea that everyone in Sherman Park is a criminal for a generation. Welfare reform targeted the park as another cash scheme. The lack of resources and jobs keeps the cycle of crime going.

    I remember a big corrections job hiring event when I was a young person where they talked about it would be your job as if it was a great honor to lock the cell door on felons. We have a job system where we aren’t suppose to question orders. I could never morally lock a cell door on someone I believed to be innocent. Too many today are willing to do that. Just like we are willing not to forgive or show compassion for the families of crime victims.

    Earning that paycheck has been the greater violent criminal. Its taken away our humanity.

    • Chrisco

      Who would be that stupid to open a business in that area? Marshall”s tried and they only made it 6 months and had to close due to shop lifting. Look at the former northridge mall. The walmart on the north side per walmart has one of the highest rates of shoplifting out of all their stores. You would have to be a moron to open any kind of business on the north side.

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