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Huff, puff and explode: E-cigarette fires, injuries on rise

KNUTSFORD, UNITED KINGDOM - JULY 05: In this photo illustration a woman smokes an electronic cigarette on July 5, 2012 in Knutsford, United Kingdom. Electronic cigarettes are the latest health device for smokers hoping to quit nicotine addiction. Earlier today a major security operation took place in Staffordshire, England, after a passenger on a coach used an electronic cigarette which was mistaken for something more sinister and a full scale security alert was instigated. The 48 passengers were later allowed to carry on with their journey. (Photo illustration by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

KNUTSFORD, UNITED KINGDOM - JULY 05: In this photo illustration a woman smokes an electronic cigarette on July 5, 2012 in Knutsford, United Kingdom. Electronic cigarettes are the latest health device for smokers hoping to quit nicotine addiction. Earlier today a major security operation took place in Staffordshire, England, after a passenger on a coach used an electronic cigarette which was mistaken for something more sinister and a full scale security alert was instigated. The 48 passengers were later allowed to carry on with their journey. (Photo illustration by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

MINEOLA, N.Y. — The popularity of e-cigarettes has been accompanied by a climbing number explosions or fires in the decade since their debut.

The devices simulate tobacco smoking. Because they operate on lithium batteries, they appear to be suffering mishaps similar to some smartphones, hover boards and other products.

Elected officials, personal injury attorneys and victims are demanding action.

This year alone a teenager at a Florida amusement park was burned. A man was chatting with co-workers in New York’s Grand Central Terminal when his pants erupted in flames. And a Brooklyn boy was partially blinded.

The Food and Drug Administration started regulating the devices in May. It is reporting increasing numbers of injuries in the past 18 months from exploding e-cigarettes.