“We’re construction workers now:” Texas fisherman stayed behind to protect home during Harvey

ROCKPORT, Texas -- Floodwaters reached the roof lines of single-story homes Monday and people could be heard pleading for help from inside as Harvey poured rain on the Houston area for a fourth consecutive day after a chaotic weekend of rising water and rescues.

The nation's fourth-largest city was still largely paralyzed by one of the largest downpours in U.S. history. And there was no relief in sight from the storm that spun into Texas as a Category 4 hurricane, then parked itself over the Gulf Coast. With nearly 2 more feet of rain expected, authorities worried whether the worst was yet to come.

Harvey has been blamed for at least two confirmed deaths. A Houston television station reported Monday that six family members were believed to have drowned when their van was swept away by floodwaters.

The KHOU report was attributed to three family members the station did not identify. No bodies have been recovered. Police Chief Art Acevedo told The Associated Press that he had no information about the report but said that he's "really worried about how many bodies we're going to find."

Harvey damage in Texas

FOX6's Evan Peterson has friends who live in some of the hardest-hit areas along the Texas coast. One of them stayed behind to ride out the storm.

"It's devastating. Especially, you know, I'm a third-generation shrimper," Christopher Frisco said.

Christopher Frisco

Frisco grew up in Rockport, Texas and remains in the small fishing community where many chose to stay amid Hurricane Harvey. It's one of the areas hit hardest by the storm.

"We're all going to be construction workers now. There's no fishing guides. There's no oyster-ing. I'm sure our bays are not good right now for oysters because of this," Frisco said.

Photos shared with FOX6 News by Frisco and Katie Scott, who lives in Rosenberg, Texas show the devastation Harvey has created. The photos show a multi-story boat garage, split in half, a popular tourist hotel, the Lighthouse Inn, pushed over, debris strewn throughout a high school in the area, and much more damage, not just on land.

Harvey damage in Texas

Harvey damage in Texas

Damaged boats in a multi-level storage facility are seen following passage of Hurricane Harvey at Rockport, Texas on August 26, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / MARK RALSTON (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)

Harvey damage in Texas

"So many boats out in the bay that our waters are ruined. That's kind of my biggest deal," Frisco said.

Power lines, cell towers and communication hubs were destroyed by the storm. Frisco said he's simply lucky to be alive.

Harvey damage in Texas

Harvey damage in Texas

"Get the power lines cleared so we can get power and so we can start over again," Frisco said.

He said he realizes it's going to get worse before it gets better.

Harvey damage in Texas

Harvey damage in Texas

Frisco sent his wife and children out of Rockport to seek shelter, and he stayed behind to protect his home. When asked whether he regrets staying, he said no, but he did say he recognizes he's put himself in harm's way. He said he believes he'll make it through the next round if the community continues to care for one another as they have been.