Randall Cobb on Rodgers’ broken collarbone: “Now the rest of us have to step up”

MILWAUKEE -- While fans of the green and gold were feeling blue Monday, October 16th, one day after QB Aaron Rodgers broke his collarbone vs. the Minnesota Vikings -- an injury that requires surgery, one of Rodgers' top targets said there's still reason to be hopeful.

One of the cruel realities of the NFL is the saying "next man up." Whenever a player goes down, someone has to replace him and get the job done. Randall Cobb said to get the job done, it'll require several players stepping up, himself included.

Randall Cobb

After announcing a $20,000 donation to promote literacy in the Milwaukee area, Cobb said he understands why fans might consider Rodgers' broken collarbone a catastrophe.

"If your house burned down, the next day, you gotta get back up and you gotta build it back up," Cobb said.

Cobb said the Packers are beginning those repairs, adding it will take a lot of hands to build their house back up.

MINNEAPOLIS, MN - OCTOBER 15: Anthony Barr #55 of the Minnesota Vikings hits quarterback Aaron Rodgers #12 of the Green Bay Packers during the first quarter of the game on October 15, 2017 at US Bank Stadium in Minneapolis, Minnesota. (Photo by Adam Bettcher/Getty Images)

MINNEAPOLIS, MN - OCTOBER 15: Aaron Rodgers #12 of the Green Bay Packers clenches his right knee after being hit during the first quarter of the game against the Minnesota Vikings on October 15, 2017 at US Bank Stadium in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Aaron Rodgers hurt vs. Vikings

MINNEAPOLIS, MN - OCTOBER 15: Aaron Rodgers #12 of the Green Bay Packers rides a cart into the locker room after being injured during the first quarter of the game against the Minnesota Vikings on October 15, 2017 at US Bank Stadium in Minneapolis, Minnesota. (Photo by Adam Bettcher/Getty Images)

"Aaron, he means a lot to our team, obviously. He's the leader. He's the guy we all look to and he's out, so now the rest of us have to step up," Cobb said.

Mike Holzberger

"Brett Hundley can get them to the playoffs. I mean, they might not win the division, but he can get them to 9-7," Mike Holzberger with Connections Ticket Service said.

While Cobb and Holzberger have hope in the backup QB, the market so far is telling a different story.

"I would say, on average, prices across the board for the rest of the Packers' season are down 30 to 40 percent," Holzberger said.

Holzberger said tickets for the game Sunday, October 22nd vs. the New Orleans Saints were $250 minimum before Rodgers' injury. On Monday, you could get into Lambeau on the 22nd for $150.

"Let's not be hasty and think the tickets are going to go to $75 or anything like that. It's still a very scarce ticket," Holzberger said.

With one bad landing, the fortunes may have changed for ticket sellers and of course, the team itself.

Cobb said that's the unfortunate reality of football.

ARLINGTON, TX - OCTOBER 08: Aaron Rodgers #12 of the Green Bay Packers scrambles with the ball against David Irving #95 of the Dallas Cowboys in the fourth quarter at AT&T Stadium on October 8, 2017 in Arlington, Texas. (Photo by Tom Pennington/Getty Images)

"Whether it was now, or 10 years from now, there's one day when Aaron Rodgers won't be on the field and someone else will have to step in," Cobb said.

Holzberger said October noon games are always a prime ticket because generally speaking, the weather is good and people can get home at a reasonable hour. He said if there's a losing streak for the Packers, ticket prices could really plummet once the temperature drops.