Acupuncture providing relief for PTSD

Young woman undergoing acupuncture treatment, closeup

Scottsdale, Arizona — Acupuncture is growing in popularity across the country, and now many who have been diagnosed with PTSD are getting needled for some relief.

One local acupuncture business says this is a treatment that really works.

With the small pinch of each tiny needle, the healing power of acupuncture comes over U.S. Navy Veteran, Bruce Migdalek.

“The change that its made in the neuropothy, is just dramatic,” Migdalek said.

Migdalek says his acupuncture treatments are mainly for his diabetic neuropothy, which is a type of nerve damage that can occur with diabetes.

“It’s reduced my comfort in pain, I’d have to say, about 90 percent,” Migdalek said.

Acupuncture has also been proven to work well for post traumatic stress disorder, something that nearly 25 million Americans deal with, many of whom served in the military.

Steve Gubernick of Modern Acupuncture in Scottsdale says when treating PTSD, the ears are the pathway to the calming centers of the brain.

“Anytime you can use for example, these points in the ear, to activate the brain, which in effect calms those stress centers in the brain that’s chronically running stress firing, deactivates, it let’s the brain shut down, it lets the chemicals, the feel good chemicals start to fire and it helps them feel a lot better, in the long run,” said Gubernick.

Gubernick says the benefits of acupuncture are lasting, sometimes up to as long as 3 months.

Regular treatments are recommended.

At Modern Acupuncture you can get two treatments for $69 a month.

“That allows people to come regularly. It’s not a one and done type of thing, I mean we get a lot of home runs but these things take work, just like going to the gym,” said Migdalek. “Acupuncture has been life changing for him, but results can take time, so be patient.”

“Getting an acupuncture treatment is like getting supercharged, its almost like an electric feeling, but it feels good, there’s no pain involved at all,” Migdalek said.