UN Ambassador Nikki Haley on Pres. Trump accusers: ‘We should all be willing to listen to them’

JACKSON, MS - DECEMBER 09: President Donald Trump speaks after touring the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum on December 9, 2017 in Jackson, Mississippi. The museum had a grand opening event and hopes to promote a greater understanding of the Mississippi Civil Rights Movement and its impact by highlighting the strength and sacrifices of its people. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

WASHINGTON, D.C. — US Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley said Sunday that any women who speak up about inappropriate sexual behavior “should be heard,” including President Donald Trump’s accusers.

Speaking on CBS’s “Face the Nation,” Haley was asked by moderator John Dickerson about the cultural reckoning that is happening on the issue of sexual harassment and assault, including the recent resignations of three members of Congress who have been accused of sexual misconduct.

Haley said she was “incredibly proud of the women who have come forward.”

“I’m proud of their strength,” she added. “I’m proud of their courage. And I think that the idea that this is happening, I think it will start to bring a conscience to the situation, not just in politics, but in, you know, we’ve seen in Hollywood and in every industry. And I think the time has come.”

In addition to the infamous 2005 “Access Hollywood” recording of President Trump bragging about groping women that surfaced during the 2016 campaign, several women have accused President Trump of sexual harassment.

President Trump attributed his language on the tape to “locker room talk” and has denied any sexual wrongdoing.

When asked about President Trump’s accusers by Dickerson on Sunday, Haley said the women should be heard.

“Well, I mean, you know, the same thing, is women who accuse anyone should be heard,” Haley said. “They should be heard and they should be dealt with. And I think we heard from them prior to the election. And I think any woman who has felt violated or felt mistreated in any way, they have every right to speak up.”

The accusations against President Trump have recirculated with the current conversation about sexual harassment in Congress and allegations against Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore, who is accused of pursuing relationships with teenagers, molesting a 14-year-old and sexually assaulting a 16-year-old when he was in his 30s.” Moore has repeatedly denied the allegations.

Despite accusations against Moore, President Trump endorsed the controversial Republican candidate ahead of Tuesday’s election.

When asked last month about the allegations against President Trump, White House press secretary Sarah Sanders said: “Look, I think that this was covered pretty extensively during the campaign. We addressed that then. The American people, I think, spoke very loud and clear when they elected this president.”

Haley echoed the statements from the White House about the accusations, telling Dickerson that whether the issue was settled during the election is “for the people to decide.”

“You know, that’s for the people to decide,” Haley told Dickerson when asked if it was a settled issue following the election. “I know that he was elected. But, you know, women should always feel comfortable coming forward. And we should all be willing to listen to them.”