Romney, Santorum, Paul leading GOP candidates after caucus

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IOWA -- Republican presidential hopefuls finally heard from Iowa voters in Tuesday night's caucuses, and already one candidate has dropped out of the race. Michele Bachmann dumped her bid for the presidency after a last place showing in Iowa. The Iowa caucus left three serious contenders to take on Barack Obama in this year's presidential election: Mitt Romney, Rick Santorum and Ron Paul.

After months and months of presidential campaigning in Iowa, the caucuses are now over, and the voters have delivered a mixed message, leaving three candidates at the top. When all 1,774 caucuses tallied their results after voters took to the polls Tuesday night, it was the closest race in Iowa caucus history!

Romney, with name recognition, the organization, money and political pedigree is the establishment candidate. With a late surge, former Pennsylvania Senator Rick Santorum finished only a handful of votes behind Romney. He represents the social conservatives. Texas Congressman Ron Paul is a libertarian, popular with young voters.

Iowa offered no clear answer as to the type of Republican who might take on President Obama in the general election. "It's kind of a mixed message. I'm kind of confused about that," Iowa voter Kathy Barsetti said. She's one of many voters who don't know what to make of the split decision. Many voters say with such different candidates at the top, it's tough to make a choice. "I still have no clue who to vote for. I'm just up in the air, really," Shellie Skjordal said.

The focus of the campaign now shifts to the nation's first presidential primary in New Hampshire, but Iowans relished their time in the spotlight. "It was a lot of fun to live in Iowa, and watch all of this. I think it's fun to watch retail politics, and I think it works. People who don't have a lot of money can still try to run for president by getting out and meeting everybody," Iowa voter Dick Lyford said.

If the race continues to be close, the Wisconsin primary on April 3rd could take on new importance.