NRA bombards Newtown residents with robo calls

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.

NEWTOWN, CT (CNN) — A little more than three months after the mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School, a series of robo calls hoping to pressure politicians from passing anti-gun legislation is causing outrage.

While state lawmakers are trying to come up with a comprehensive bill aimed at reducing gun violence and improving safety, the National Rifle Association is calling homes and calling on voters to pressure local leaders into rejecting any new gun control laws.

“Calling from 703-267-1200 with an urgent legislative alert. Your state senator, Art Linares, will play a key role in determining whether the CT General Assembly will pass legislation restricting your gun rights,” the call said.

The Huffington Post recently posted a recording of one of the calls that is making its way into homes, including those in Newtown.

“Respectfully urge him to oppose any legislation that tramples your Second Amendment right, and inhibits your inherent right to self defense,” the call continued.

For a town touched by tragedy, some feel it’s still too raw, calling the calls callous and inappropriate.

On the Newtown Action Alliance Facebook page, one man asked that his name and phone number be removed from the list, but he’s still getting the calls.

The NRA is allowed to make these robo calls because it is a nonprofit.

In addition to the pre-recorded calls, the organization is also sending out postcards with similar messages. The calls and postcards come as Connecticut lawmakers continue to take up gun control.

“I think it’s disgusting and I think it’s intentional,” United States Sen. Chris Murphy said. “I don’t think it’s a mistake that the NRA is making calls into Newtown.”

The push from the NRA is timed just as local lawmakers are crafting numerous gun reform laws that could make our state one of the toughest on weapons. Lawmakers are now seeing these calls as another element to fight in this battle.

“We will be matching their effort here in Connecticut and with allies throughout the country,” said United States Sen. Richard Blumenthal.

Last week, the Public Safety and Security Committee passed a bill that would require criminal background checks for all private firearm sales. Now it will go to the General Assembly for a full vote.

Notice: you are using an outdated browser. Microsoft does not recommend using IE as your default browser. Some features on this website, like video and images, might not work properly. For the best experience, please upgrade your browser.