Grandfather of former missing Milwaukee boy working to help others

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MILWAUKEE (WITI) -- Over seven years ago, on a warm March day, two Milwaukee boys disappeared -- their bodies eventually discovered in a park lagoon. Years later, one boy's grandfather is fighting to keep his grandson's memory alive.

"There's never closure, there's never closure, even now," Garry Henning said.

Henning's grandson, Quadrevion disappeared at the age of 12, along with his friend, 11-year-old Pervis Parker. The two were last seen walking to a basketball court.

Quadrevion's family grew frantic when the boy didn't come home by 6:00.

"That was the worst day of our lives," Henning said.

For 27 days, there were no answers for the family.

"Out of body experience. You're numb," Henning said.

Eventually, the bodies of the boys were discovered.

"At least you can say I know where they are," Henning said.

Since that day, Henning has been working as an advocate for nearly 40 Milwaukee families dealing with missing children. He offers them services on behalf of the Support Network for Families with Missing and Exploited Children.

"I get tired sometimes but Drey is right here saying 'Papa, keep helping the families,'" Henning said.

Henning was taking part in a national roundtable event on missing children when news broke that three women in Cleveland, Ohio were freed from a home they had been held in for years. Henning says the focus at the roundtable quickly became all about the news coverage.

"Some people were so happy, but yet they were thinking in terms, 'Lord, I wish that had been my daughter or my son,'" Henning said.

Henning says hope is important for these families -- and the Cleveland case is an important example.

"You always keep hope.  If you don't have hope, what do you have?" Henning said.

Henning is a member of Team Hope. He helps families through the steps of searching for a child -- helping to make police reports, print posters and serve as a shoulder to lean on. Henning says in most cases, the children do turn up alive.

CLICK HERE for additional information on "Team Hope."