Heat and humidity affect practices at SE WI schools on Tuesday

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MILWAUKEE (WITI) -- With the heat and humidity on Tuesday, September 10th, there were a lot of people making decisions regarding outdoor activities for children. Coaches in southeastern Wisconsin had to decide just how much was too much outdoor activity for their students.

There are some state athletic guidelines when it comes to the heat, but other things are just up to the coaches.

At University School of Milwaukee practices were planned for Tuesday afternoon for soccer, field hockey, tennis, football and cross country.

“We were actually supposed to run three miles, but the coach called that off today because it was too hot," Jack Wells, a soccer player at University School said.

Although soccer practice did go on, it was only after careful consideration.

“We’ll take temperature readings generally every half hour and then we go off the WIAA guidelines for how to handle practice," Mike Baese, an athletic trainer for University School said.

Among other things, the guidelines say if the heat index is above 104 degrees, outside activity must stop.

Baese says he takes a reading.

"Basically, all we really need are the temperature and the percentage of the humidity and then from there we can plug that into a NOAA calculator and it will give you the index for the day or at that time," Baese said.

Baese advises coaches to give students 10 minute breaks every 30 minutes. Additionally, practice can be shortened and football teams can remove some equipment while not involved in contact.

There is cold water strategically placed along the practice fields and ice cold towels as well.

Coaches and team captains like Wells are making sure athletes don't get overheated.

“I’m always watching out for it because a lot of guys won’t want to stop but I have to see and say I think we need to stop," Baese said.

CLICK HERE to take a look at the WIAA's heat guidelines.

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