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Oh deer! Drivers beware: June is the worst month for crashes with deer

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MILWAUKEE (WITI) -- Oh deer! It's that time of year again. Wildlife experts say June is the worst month of the year for deer-car crashes.

"The rural roads tend to be a little more prevalent for the collisions," DNR Wildlife Biologist Dianne Robinson said.

Robinson says June is a busy month for Wisconsin's deer population. It's typically the time many search for a place to give birth and yearlings separate from their mother.

"It`s like kicking your kid out when they are 18 to go to college.  They`re going to make mistakes, but hopefully it will work out for the best," Robinson said.

Except sometimes...it doesn't.

Across the state, 18,313 deer vs. motor vehicle crashes were reported in 2013.

Waukesha County has the distinction of having the most incidents in Wisconsin.

According to the Wisconsin Department of Transportation, Waukesha was the worst last year, with more than 800 reported collisions.

"We`ve gotten a number of calls about people worried about deer because it`s right during rush hour and there`s a deer walking next to the road," Robinson said.

So is there any way to prevent these crashes?

Robinson says if you see deer, slow down or stop the car. Don't swerve.

"When it`s dusk and dawn, when the light is changing it`s harder for us to see and that`s when the deer are moving," Robinson said.

You may think it will help, but it's actually a bad idea to flash your headlights.

"It`s going to confuse the deer even more," Robinson said.

The Wisconsin DOT suggests honking your horn with one long blast to frighten any deer you see on the side of the road.

Summertime weather also means there are more cars out on the road.

Robinson says drivers should remember -- when you see a deer, look around for another one. Deer rarely run alone.