NASA: Mars rover Curiosity snaps new panoramic selfie

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HOUSTON — In this age of selfies, even robots can get a little narcissistic.

NASA has released new images of its Curiosity rover on the surface of Mars, snapped by the rover itself using the ultimate selfie stick: its 7-foot-long robotic arm. Dozens of images, shot August 5, were stitched together to form a striking self-portrait of Curiosity atop the Red Planet’s “Buckskin” rock formation.

One low-angle image shows the unmanned vehicle’s belly at the Buckskin site where it drilled down to collect a sample of Martian soil. For this shot, NASA said, the rover team positioned the camera lower than for any previous full self-portrait of Curiosity.

This low-angle self-portrait of NASA's Curiosity Mars rover shows the vehicle above the "Buckskin" rock target, where the mission collected its seventh drilled sample. The site is in the "Marias Pass" area of lower Mount Sharp. (Credit: NASA)

This low-angle self-portrait of NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover shows the vehicle above the “Buckskin” rock target, where the mission collected its seventh drilled sample. The site is in the “Marias Pass” area of lower Mount Sharp. (Credit: NASA)

This month marks the third anniversary of Curiosity’s landing on Mars. During that time, it has journeyed almost 7 miles, snapped countless photos and discovered an ancient riverbed, which helped scientists determine that Mars’ environment probably could have once supported life.

The rover is currently climbing Mars’ Mount Sharp, a Mount Rainier-size mountain at the center of the planet’s vast Gale Crater. We can expect to see more Curiosity selfies along the way.

CLICK HERE to learn more about the latest on the Curiosity mission.

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