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Pentagon to make “condolence payments” to victims of U.S. airstrike on Afghan hospital

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Photo: Aftermath of the bombing that left 3 staff dead and many poeple wounded Three MSF staff were killed and more than 30 are currently unaccounted for when the trauma center they were working in was hit several times during sustained bombing around 2.10a local Saturday morning, according to an MSF statement. Bart Janssens, MSF Director of Operations said: "We do not yet have the final casualty figures, but our medical team are providing first aid and treating the injured patients and MSF personnel and accounting for the deceased. In a statement e-mailed to media the Taliban allege that American forces carried out the strikes that hit the hospital in Kunduz city. Since fighting broke out Monday, MSF staff have treated 394 wounded individuals. When the aerial attack occurred Saturday morning 105 patients and their caretakers were in the hospital and over 80 MSF international and national staff present.

WASHINGTON — The United States will make “condolence payments” to the wounded victims and the families of 22 people killed in the airstrike against a Doctors Without Borders hospital in Kunduz, Afghanistan, last week, Pentagon spokesman Peter Cook announced Saturday.

The amount of the payments has not been determined, Cook said.

“If necessary and appropriate, the administration will seek additional authority from the Congress,” he said, adding that the payments will go to “civilian non-combatants injured and the families of civilian non-combatants killed as a result of U.S. military operations.”

Photo: Aftermath of the bombing that left 3 staff dead and many poeple wounded Three MSF staff were killed and more than 30 are currently unaccounted for when the trauma center they were working in was hit several times during sustained bombing around 2.10a local Saturday morning, according to an MSF statement.  Bart Janssens, MSF Director of Operations said: "We do not yet have the final casualty figures, but our medical team are providing first aid and treating the injured patients and MSF personnel and accounting for the deceased.  In a statement e-mailed to media the Taliban allege that American forces carried out the strikes that hit the hospital in Kunduz city.  Since fighting broke out Monday, MSF staff have treated 394 wounded individuals. When the aerial attack occurred Saturday morning 105 patients and their caretakers were in the hospital and over 80 MSF international and national staff present.

Photo: Aftermath of the bombing that left 3 staff dead and many poeple wounded
Three MSF staff were killed and more than 30 are currently unaccounted for when the trauma center they were working in was hit several times during sustained bombing around 2.10a local Saturday morning, according to an MSF statement. Bart Janssens, MSF Director of Operations said: “We do not yet have the final casualty figures, but our medical team are providing first aid and treating the injured patients and MSF personnel and accounting for the deceased. In a statement e-mailed to media the Taliban allege that American forces carried out the strikes that hit the hospital in Kunduz city. Since fighting broke out Monday, MSF staff have treated 394 wounded individuals. When the aerial attack occurred Saturday morning 105 patients and their caretakers were in the hospital and over 80 MSF international and national staff present.

Earlier this week, U.S. President Barack Obama called and apologized to the head of Doctors Without Borders, whose staff and patients were killed and injured. The attack in the embattled city October 3 killed 12 medical staff members and at least 10 patients, three of them children.

Another 37 people were wounded, according to the global charity group, which works in conflict zones to help victims of war and other tragedies.

Gen. John Campbell, commander of U.S. forces in Afghanistan, has said the hospital was hit accidentally during an American airstrike. The Pentagon is carrying out an investigation, as are NATO and Afghanistan.

The charity group — which is also known as Medecins Sans Frontieres, or MSF, and provides medical care in some of the world’s most dangerous places — is calling the strike an “attack on the Geneva Conventions.”

Doctors Without Borders said it wants a full and transparent investigation by an independent agency.

5 comments

    • cybervigilante

      Well, everyone thought we were in Syria to bomb ISIS, which we couldn’t find for some reason, although the Russians are finding them just fine. Turns out we were really there for another failed “regime change” a la Iraq and Libya. What a surprise. Of course we’re only supporting “moderate” terrorists like Al Nusra (which is just an alternate spelling of Al Quada). All of this is to keep the Dark Age Terror Kingdom of Saudi Arabia happy. So what if they bombed the Twin Towers? They’re “allies.”

  • dighard

    Y is my tax money going for this???
    It’s so easy to throw money around that not yours.
    Like Grunt comment said.

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