“Taking the lead to help:” Groups announce listening session for young people in community

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.

MILWAUKEE -- Making sure young voices have their say... That is the reasoning behind a "Soundoff Forum" for Milwaukee's youth set for Friday, March 4th.

Back in January, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) hosted a community listening session at the Milwaukee Public Library. Hundreds showed up to vent -- and it was the first step in the investigative process called the Collaborative Reform Initiative.

Chris Ahmuty

Chris Ahmuty

"Whereas the Justice Department COPS office didn't feel that they had the resources to immediately do a session for young people, the Coalition is taking the lead to help organize this event on Friday," said Chris Ahmuty of the Milwaukee ACLU.

On Wednesday, March 2nd, the Coalition for Justice along with partner groups announced an "Empowering Youth Soundoff" listening session. It'll be held on Friday at 5:30 p.m. at the Wisconsin Black Historical Society (2620 W. Center Street).

Nate Hamilton

Nate Hamilton

"We feel like we cannot go further in the conversation, talking about social justice and not include the youth. We know that they are the ones that are looked over the most," said Nate Hamilton.

At the request of Milwaukee Police Chief Ed Flynn, the Department of Justice's Community-Oriented Policing Services is conducting the Collaborative Review Process -- an assessment of MPD's policies, practices and accountability system.

Coalition co-founder Nate Hamilton says making young people part of the process can be a character builder.

"Giving them that respect, we're hoping that it channels a certain type of energy amongst the youth, that they start feeling more responsible. I think when you give them more responsibility then they're able to react in a better way," Hamilton said.

Coalition for Justice

Following the assessment, the DOJ will issue a public report of its findings. The whole Collaborative Review process could take up to two years -- but it could result in some changes to the police department and the city.

5 comments

  • supra et ultra

    “There is a class of colored people who make a business of keeping the troubles, the wrongs, and the hardships of the Negro race before the public. Having learned that they are able to make a living out of their troubles, they have grown into the settled habit of advertising their wrongs-partly because they want sympathy and partly because it pays. Some of these people do not want the Negro to lose his grievances, because they do not want to lose their jobs.” BOOKER T. Washington. Here’s one of them:
    http://jail.com/arrest-records/nathaniel-hamilton-13374824

  • molon labe

    Interrupting a public event such as the Christmas tree lighting ceremony for the sake of your pitiful, distasteful cause is pathetic! Go to where he was buried to honor him. When I see people acting like this and protesting, I think about adolescence in an adult body. It’s really sad when Momma goes to collect back unemployment from their dead son – really sad.

  • mike robe

    Hey liberal anarchist trash !!!! Dontre Hamilton died as a result of his family (yes his momma and his brother) kicking him out on the streets because THEY COULDNT HANDLE his mental illness, and DONTRE HAMLTON attacked a police officer with a stick and tried to KILL him ! So in SELF DEFENSE the officer shot poor Dontre !!! A tragedy all the way around BUT HIS DEATH had nothing to do WITH HIS COLOR no matter how much his lazy brother and family want to try and shake down the city for with the aide of an ambulance chasing lawyer. If Black lives really matter why do black people keep killing each other. Those shot in police encounters are shot fighting or assaulting police WHICH we as a civil society are NOT allowed to do.

  • lolzsec

    Suppose you are in an ideal position to raise a flourishing child. You are well-educated, financially secure, have plenty of social support, and so on. (I do not mean to imply that lacking any of these advantages will necessarily prevent a child from flourishing – just that these are advantages, in that they improve the odds that a child will flourish.) Further, suppose that you have a loving disposition, and would certainly care deeply and well for any child you might have. Yet, as it happens, you are ambivalent about the prospect of having children, since you have many other interests and life projects you value, which would be curtailed (at least to some extent) were you to have children. http://www.procon.org/view.resource.php?resourceID=005349

Comments are closed.