“It’s destroying so many lives:” Drug Take-Back Day fights prescription drug abuse across Wisconsin

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MEQUON -- Prescription drug abuse has long been a growing problem in Wisconsin with some of the issues starting right in the family medicine cabinet. However, the Wisconsin Department of Justice and the U.S. Drug Enforcement administration are working to take back those drugs.

Drug Take Back Day

Drug Take Back Day

"It's destroying so many lives and it's not just the deaths. This is so much pain and suffering and we can stop it if we get control of what's happening with prescription medications within our homes," said Attorney General Brad Schimel.

Drug Take Back Day

On Saturday, October 22nd, the Department of Justice teamed up with the DEA to present another Drug Take-Back Day.

"We want people to understand if you're done with that prescription, if you used it once, you don't need it anymore or it's expired, just get rid of it," said Danielle Long, Department of Justice.

The Drug Take-Back events are held twice a year.dose1

"Last spring, we collected over 64,000 pounds of unused, unwanted drugs. We are third in the country behind California and Texas," said Long.

Drug Take Back Day

Drug Take Back Day

"That says that Wisconsin gets it. That the households in our state understand that this is serious and that they have a responsibility," said Schimel.

During the Drug Take-Back event, there were 127 pop-up locations across the state, many of them being quite successful.

Hy Eglash went to the Mequon location to rid his house of old medications.

"I found some that was 5 years old that I should have gotten rid of a long time ago," said Eglash.

As a retired pharmacist, he knows the importance of dumping the drugs.

Drug Take Back Day

Drug Take Back Day

"I made sure that everything that I had left over that was not being used is destroyed properly and not flushed down the toilet where it can cause harm in the waterways," said Eglash.

It also means they won't end up in the wrong hands.

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