Twitter says all 336 million users should change their passwords

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LONDON, ENGLAND - NOVEMBER 07: In this photo illustration, The Twitter logo is displayed on a mobile device as the company announced it's initial public offering and debut on the New York Stock Exchange on November 7, 2013 in London, England. Twitter went public on the NYSE opening at USD 26 per share, valuing the company's worth at an estimated USD 18 billion. (Photo by Bethany Clarke/Getty Images)

Twitter has recommended its more than 336 million users change their passwords.

The company announced on Thursday it discovered a bug that saved user passwords on an internal log without proper encryption.

Twitter said it has since fixed the issue. Although the company said there is no evidence passwords have been leaked or misused, it is urging its users to update their passwords.

“As a precaution, consider changing your password on all services where you’ve used this password,” the company tweeted.

Twitter is prompting users to change their passwords via a pop-up window on the site that explains the nature of the bug and links to their Settings page.

Twitter did not specify how many passwords were stored in the internal log. The company did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

CEO Jack Dorsey said in a tweet the company believed it was important to “be open about this internal defect.”

Meanwhile, Twitter CTO Parag Agrawal tweeted an apology for the issue.

“We are sharing this information to help people make an informed decision about their account security. We didn’t have to, but believe it’s the right thing to do,” he said.

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