Delegates from Asia in Milwaukee to share ideas on how to stop human trafficking

MILWAUKEE -- Leaders from around the world were in Milwaukee Monday, Sept. 10 to discuss human trafficking, and figure out ways to crack down on it globally.

In downtown Milwaukee, a portion of the Milwaukee Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse was transformed into a classroom of sorts.

Matthew Krueger

"Some of that activity stays here in Wisconsin, but it's not uncommon, unfortunately, for these offenders to travel with these victims," said Matthew Krueger, United States attorney.

Delegates from countries like Cambodia, Malaysia and Thailand were on hand, seeking insight from United States' officials about how to address human trafficking problems back in their home countries. The Department of Justice, the FBI and the Department of Homeland Security spearheaded the international study tour, where officials from guest nations were able to get a firsthand look at how the United States views the problem of human trafficking.

"Typically girls, typically females here from Wisconsin, often from some of the poorest areas of Milwaukee and other parts of our district become the victims. I hope that we could learn from you techniques that you have used to try an infiltrate a criminal organization's networks," said Krueger.

The two-day stop in Milwaukee was one in a series for the visiting delegates, who had already stopped in New Jersey, New York and Atlanta. A stop in Omaha, Nebraska after Milwaukee would cap off their two-week trip.