116-pound dog nearly dies after likely ingesting meth in bushes

**Embargo: Phoenix, AZ** Walking your dog is probably something you do every day, but local veterinarians are warning dog owners about what the pups sniff and eat on the ground after a Paradise Valley family almost lost their dog this week to drugs.

PARADISE VALLEY, Ariz. — Walking your dog is probably something you do every day, but veterinarians are warning dog owners about what the pups sniff and eat on the ground after an Arizona family almost lost their dog this week to drugs.

Dexter is a 116-pound Bernese mountain dog who likes to play, swim, and on Monday, accidentally do drugs.

“He started acting really weird. He was looking around like all over like this,” said Natalee Segal-Josephs.

But doing drugs was never the intent. Segal-Josephs had her business broken into on Monday, and brought Dexter to the scene while she was talking to the police.

“He was rooting through the bushes, which he’s done before,” she said.

But as they were leaving, she noticed Dexter started heavily panting, she knew something was wrong, and rushed to the vet.

“I thought the dog was going to have a heart attack in my car,” Segal-Josephs said.

His temperature got up to 109 degrees. The vets worried his organs would shut down, not knowing why he was having a problem.

Hours later Segal-Josephs rushed him to the animal hospital, where her family got a terrifying answer.

“They did a urine test and that’s when I knew for sure it was methamphetamine. That’s what they told me,” she said.

They believe he ingested meth while at the break-in scene after sniffing the bushes.

“How detrimental is it to dogs to ingest these kinds of drugs?” asked reporter Briana Whitney.

“Potentially fatal,” said local veterinarian Eric Roberts.

Roberts said emergency hospitals in the Valley are not only seeing more dogs coming in with meth in their systems, but even more commonly, marijuana — and it’s hard to diagnose.

“It’s a big problem. It’s not necessarily scary, it’s just sad. You know, these animals aren’t asking for it,” said Roberts.

A scary experience for Segal-Josephs, who is now hoping Dexter’s medications are the only drugs he’ll be on in her house during his recovery.

“This animal is the most loving thing I’ve ever had in my life,” she said.