1st responders stress that no ice is safe, warn against ‘a false sense of security’

Toby Carlson

MILWAUKEE -- With spring on the way, and some experiencing cabin fever after bitterly cold air and several rounds of snow moved through in January and February, first responders on Monday, March 11 issued a warning about thin ice -- with some melting getting underway.

Officials with North Shore Fire/Rescue said no ice is safe.

"What ends up happening now is, as we start to go into the transition phase where it starts to get warmer, people start to get a false sense of security," said Toby Carlson with North Shore Fire/Rescue.

With temperatures above freezing, and a high of 60° in the forecast for Thursday, March 14, the ice and snow started to melt, making conditions on waterways dangerous.

"Something that's very thick and safe in one area, a few steps in a different area can be very unsafe," said Carlson.

When the transition to spring begins, North Shore Fire/Rescue officials take part in ice rescue training because these types of calls become more common. On Monday, officials said they responded over the weekend after a dog fell through the ice. He was not located.

"The challenge is, we can't tell what's going on underneath that frozen body of water," said Carlson.

North Shore Fire/Rescue officials stressed any body of water with a current, and any ice has the potential to be dangerous.

"It's that self deception we have that can kind of get us in trouble sometimes," said Carlson.

If you do need to venture out onto the ice, first responders said you should always have a life jacket, and let people know where you are going in case of an emergency.

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