Airfare myths that could cost you

From the best time of day to search for a flight to how far in advance you should purchase your ticket, it’s not hard to find advice on getting a cheap flight.
Unfortunately, many of these tricks are either outdated or simply wrong. Consumer Reports says if you blindly follow them, you could be missing out on better deals elsewhere. Consumer Reports identified three common airfare myths, and what you can do instead to score a better deal.

The first myth -- Tuesdays are the best days to book airfare.

"This myth started when airlines used to load fares at the beginning of the week. But now airlines are much more sophisticated in the way that they price tickets, changing the price 24 hours a day, 7 days a week  and for consumers that means they can find a deal any day of the week," explained Octavio Blanco, Consumer Reports money editor.

Consumer Reports says follow airlines’ social media accounts and set up alerts so that you’ll be notified immediately when sales become available.

Next myth, it's always better to book as far in advance as possible.

"Airlines don’t start actively managing inventory until five to three months before departure. So, if you buy your ticket too earlier, you’ll probably pay more than what you would if you’d waited to buy in that period," Blanco said.

The last myth, a round-trip airline ticket is a better deal than two one-way fares.

"Online booking sites have gotten really good at finding travelers money saving one-way flight combinations," Blanco said.

Kayak offers so-called “hacker fares,” where a flight search will look for two one-way tickets that collectively make a round-trip flight. You might have to use
different airlines for departing and arriving flights, but you also may also get the cheapest possible flight.

Consumer Reports says another way to find good flight deals is to look for air and hotel packages. You can find plenty that include a business class seat and a five-night hotel stay by visiting your favorite airlines’ websites.

All Consumer Reports material Copyright 2019 Consumer Reports, Inc. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Consumer Reports is a not-for-profit organization which accepts no advertising. It has no commercial relationship with any advertiser or sponsor on this site. For more information visit consumerreports.org.

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