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Not if, but when: Wisconsin, Milwaukee continue preventive measures against coronavirus

Data pix.

MILWAUKEE -- It's not a question of if, but rather a matter of when. Those are the words coming from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention about the spread of the coronavirus.

Gov. Tony Evers

"Our health services staff is in constant contact with the CDC. Whatever they are suggesting we are following and making sure we get it out," said Gov. Tony Evers.

Gov. Evers is working to assure the public that the state has got things covered when it comes to coronavirus.

"We're in a preventative mode," Gov. Evers said. "If there's a significant issue we'll take it to the next level, but at this point in time we feel confident in what we're doing."

But as the virus, also known as COVID-19, brings panic to an international community, the CDC warns of the illness to come. In an interview with Dr. Nanvy Messonnier, a CDC official, she said, in short:

"Ultimately, we expect we will see community spread in this country...It's not so much a question of if this will happen anymore, but rather more a question of exactly when this will happen."

Mayor Tom Barrett

Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett said the city is preparing, too.

"All of this is happening in real-time," said Barrett. "In the event that it does reach here...we will be prepared."

City of Milwaukee health officials stress that everybody needs to prepare for it.

Nick Tomaro

"Again, it is very important that people are aware and paying attention to what's happening," said Nick Tomaro of the City of Milwaukee Health Department. "(The CDC) in simple terms came out and said this is something we need to prepare for."

Doctors say that if you think you may be sick with anything, stay home, talk with your doctor and rest up.

Doctors with Wisconsin's Department of Health Services said the mortality rate for the virus this year is less than 1 percent.

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