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Milwaukee health officials target ‘mainly the African American community’ to stop COVID-19

Data pix.

MILWAUKEE -- Milwaukee health officials on Monday, March 23 said a majority of the positive COVID-19 cases live on Milwaukee's north side, and that they planned on sending outreach teams into neighborhoods to ask people to go home in an effort to stop the spread.

"I wanna make sure that our residents, particularly on the northern part of the city, are listening to what I'm saying," said Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett. "Please, please, please do everything you can to keep your distance, literally, from other individuals. I know it's very difficult when you say, don't touch your face, not to touch your face, but please understand that there's very basic things we can do to prevent disease."

COVID-19 cases in Milwaukee

Tom Barrett

Tom Barrett

Milwaukee Health Commissioner Jeanette Kowalik announced the start of educational outreach efforts in areas with the highest number of COVID-19 cases reported -- Milwaukee's north and south side.

"The Health Department has created outreach that will go out to those communities, mainly the African American community, which is where we are seeing the most cases right now in the City of Milwaukee," said Kowalik.

Health officials noted the quicker everyone follows the guidelines set forth by the CDC and other officials -- frequent hand washing, social distancing, and simply staying home, the quicker we can get back to enjoying barbecues, sports gatherings, and socializing without a screen. Officials said it will take the help of every individual.

Washing hands

Milwaukee

Milwaukee

"You're going to see that people in their 20s, 30s, 40s, are the ones that are the age groups that are having the highest prevalence of COVID-19 positive testing," said Kowalik. "That means they are the carriers."

Mayor Barrett noted those not following government orders and CDC guidelines pose a huge risk to others.

"Staying at home will be our best path forward," said Barrett.

Kowalik said the outreach workers would be talking with residents about social distancing and hygiene.

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