FBI releases documents detailing investigation into Azana shooting

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BROOKFIELD (WITI) -- Documents released, detailing the investigation into the shooting at the Azana Salon & Spa in October of 2012 show the investigation went much deeper than it initially appeared. It seems information was passed along the chain of command all the way to President Obama, as authorities tried to determine whether the shooting was part of something much bigger.

On Sunday, October 21, 2012, Radcliffe Haughton entered the Azana Salon & Spa and opened fire, killing three women and injuring four others.

The shooting rocked the city of Brookfield and had law enforcement officials on the scene that day hustling.

Documents obtained by FOX6 News through an open records request show the shooting was the result of a domestic situation between Haughton and his estranged wife, Zina Daniel.

However, in the tense moments leading up to that conclusion, the documents show law enforcement officials investigated whether the shooting was linked to anything else.

Shortly after Haughton entered the salon that day, FBI agents in Milwaukee were dispatched to help Brookfield Police.

In an email sent from Special Agent in Charge Teresa Carlson, she details the reason for the extra support, writing: "We've got another active shooter at a mall in suburban Milwaukee. Initial reports are 17 shot at a spa in the mall. One shooter still at large."

Concerns also grew after reports of an IED at the scene of the shooting.

Officials in Washington, D.C. asked for immediate updates.

Documents show the counter-terrorism watch commander asked whether there was any terrorism nexus to this active shooter incident.

Another email showed interest from President Obama. Officials say the FBI Director talked with President Obama about the situation and was asked to provide updates.

More than five hours after the shots were fired, law enforcement officials and officials in D.C. were alerted that Haughton was later positively identified as the shooter, and the IED turned out to not have been an explosive -- but rather a container of gasoline that spilled next to a small propane cylinder.

No federal connection to terrorism was identified.