An “unfortunate incident:” Madison lab mistakenly sent live anthrax spores could reopen next week

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This image shows the infectious disease, anthrax, magnified under microscope.

MADISON — The Wisconsin lab that mistakenly received live anthrax samples may reopen by next week.

BBI Detection has been closed while the state and CDC work on testing the site and decontaminating it.

About 20 people work at BBI. Managers say no one is sick and no one is in any danger.

U.S. Defense Secretary Ash Carter says he’ll find out who was responsible for the mistaken shipments of live anthrax to 11 states and two countries, and he’ll “hold them accountable.”

Carter calls the shipments an “unfortunate incident.” He says the Pentagon will make sure that any health problems are avoided and work to ensure it never happens again.

Live anthrax samples from the Army’s Dugway Proving Ground in Utah were mistakenly sent to 24 laboratories, including ones in Australia and South Korea. Questions have been raised about possible flaws in Dugway’s procedures to ensure that anthrax samples were made fully inert before shipping them to labs.