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Those opposed to proposed “takeover” plan for under-performing MPS schools deliver petition signatures

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MENOMONEE FALLS -- Protesting a proposed "takeover" plan for under-performing Milwaukee Public Schools, dozens marched to the Menomonee Falls office of Senator Alberta Darling (R-River Hills) on Thursday, June 4th.

The proposal would allow the county executive to appoint a commissioner for these schools, and they could be turned into private or charter schools.

Under the proposed plan, Milwaukee County Executive Chris Abele would choose a commissioner to oversee the schools. Abele says this is a responsibility he would accept.

But some are trying to put a stop to the plan.

Those opposed to the "Opportunity Schools Partnership Program" delivered petition signatures to Darling's office Thursday. We're told at least 5,000 signatures were collected.

"We have a plan to improve our schools and to support our students and rather than privatizing our kids' education. We want Senator Alberta Darling and Representative Dale Kooyenga to support the parent-driven plan to improve our communities," Jennifer Epps-Addison with Wisconsin Jobs Now said.

MPS is hosting an informational meeting to discuss the proposal on Monday night, June 8th. It will be held at the MPS Administration Building at 52nd and Vliet.

6 comments

  • Amy

    Yes! Stop the Takeover! Lets put an end to the voucher program and get rid of charter schools. We need to put that money back where it belongs – public education! Stop the Takeover!

    • StudentR

      and heres a question… how can any mps student do that when the city/state continues to fail them

  • Notaxmoney

    Somebody needs to do something you just can’t leave it the way it is now. If this isn’t the answer come up with a new plan.

  • hunter

    90 % kids not reading at their age level, lets go out and picket against something trying to curb that.The largest group of people protesting are the teachers who would then have to do their job!!!!

  • Sarah

    People who have never taught in a classroom tend to think they know how to teach a large group of kids better than teachers, especially when it comes to districts with high poverty and minorities like Milwaukee. Imagine if people who have no idea how to do your job comes in and tells you what to do. That’s what a takeover would do to these schools. Poverty has a huge impact on a student’s ability to learn. Many kids don’t get enough to eat, come from unstable homes, have one or both parents in jail, are in gangs or are bullied by them, don’t speak English well, and/or have diverse learning disabilities and behavioral issues. Many students have individualized learning plans, which are legal documents that have to be followed to the letter.
    The fact is that it is the system that is broken, not the teachers. The teachers, as a whole, are doing the best they can with students with diverse needs while only having limited resources. Most of the money is used at the administrative and legislative levels (meaning testing and other requirements of the law). I am not a teacher, but I do know many teachers who have been told to just do as they are told and NOT teach according to either their abilities or their students’ abilities. That is the system and teachers are overwhelmed with requirements that do nothing for their students.
    If you really want to help public school students, then push for existing laws like No Child Left Behind, Race To The Top, Educator Effectiveness (which is not as nearly good as it sounds) and high stakes testing to be repealed so that teachers can actually teach. If at that point it becomes clear that many teachers are doing a poor job, then fight for legislation that can accurately determine if a teacher is doing his/her job. State tests are designed with middle class students in mind, not the poor or minorities, which is why they are not a good measure of teacher performance in districts like Milwaukee.

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