Marquette University student has confirmed case of mumps

Marquette University

MILWAUKEE — A Marquette University student has a confirmed case of mumps, the Milwaukee Health Department announced on Thursday, Jan. 31.

Marquette officials say the student lives in a university residence hall and is no longer contagious.

Mumps is a contagious respiratory illness caused by the mumps virus. It is spread by from an infected person through coughing, sneezing, or talking occasionally through contact with saliva. Mumps can be transmitted by sharing food, beverages or eating utensils with infected individuals. Symptoms of mumps include fever, body aches, headaches, and swelling of the salivary glands near the ears and jaw.

Officials with the Milwaukee Health Department recommend that persons experiencing symptoms consistent with mumps infection, especially swelling of one or both salivary glands, stay at home and contact your health care provider. Individuals are also advised to cover their mouths and noses when coughing or sneezing and wash hands frequently with soap and water. While most individuals recover fully, mumps infection can occasionally cause serious complications in adults that can include inflammation of the testicles in men or ovaries and breasts in women, inflammation of the brain (encephalitis), and temporary or permanent deafness.

Since 2007, Marquette says they’ve required every student receive two doses of MMR (measles, mumpes, rubella) vaccine before they are allowed to register for classes.

Vaccination with two doses of Mumps-Measles-Rubella (MMR) vaccine is the best way to prevent mumps infection.

Public health officials advise individuals to be aware of their vaccination status, and seek advice from a health care provider if your vaccinations are not up to date.

If you are currently experiencing any tenderness or swelling in the face or jaw – or if any such symptoms develop, even if you have had an MMR vaccine, you should contact your healthcare provider or the Marquette University Medical Clinic.

For more information on mumps, CLICK HERE.

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