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‘It’s OK to feel frustrated:’ Professional tips to boost mental, physical health amid ‘Safer at Home’ order

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MILWAUKEE -- State health officials have recommended that people limit interactions to five people -- not five at a time, but five total.

The adjustment to the "Safer at Home" order issued by Gov. Tony Evers may leave some feeling overwhelmed by the lack of face-to-face interaction, but there are some simple ways to help combat the quarantine blues.

While it is an adjustment, local experts say there are ways to stay healthy -- mentally and physically -- in the comfort of our own homes and backyards.

Michelle Braun

"It's OK to feel frustrated and uncertain," said Michelle Braun, a neuropsychologist with Ascension Wisconsin.

Amid the coronavirus pandemic, life as we knew it has come to a halt, but it doesn't mean our well-being needs to take a hit.

"The biggest way is to really be intentional about how we set our schedules," Braun said.

Keeping a schedule, and focusing on what you've accomplished -- instead of what you still need to do -- can help.

"A 'done list' is sort of just like it sounds," said Braun. "It's very enriching to actually write down what you did, and see the list grow."

In terms of physical health, RunFit MKE's owner Karen Berenson and her team are offering free, 15-minute Facebook Live cardio and core blasts three times a week. She is also maintaining personal training, and group fitness sessions with clients through Skype.

Karen Berenson

"I know that it's more difficult, but it's not impossible to get good workouts in the safety of our own homes," Berenson said. "The endorphins released during exercise act as the body's sort of natural painkillers and our natural mood boosters."

Above all, Berenson says fresh air and vitamin D can do wonders on the mind and body

"Being able to get outside and be one with nature is a really important aspect of not only physical health but mental health during this time," she said.

Experts are also reminding people to look at the current situation -- life in the COVID-19 pandemic -- as a temporary one.

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